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Archive for the ‘CO-OP Advertising’ Category


Bing Offers Paid Search Engine Marketing for News

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Microsoft thinks it has found a way around Google’s dominance of search engine marketing, a way to make its Bing search engine a winner.

Money.

Microsoft has suggested to high web site traffic news sites that they get unlisted from Google, by writing robots.txt files that keep them out of Google’s index, in exchange for Microsoft cash and placement on its Bing search engine.

If Microsoft is ready to take the next step, and build something like Google News for those sites it’s paying for placement, with enough online advertising to make up its costs from paying for links, then the search competition has a new front.

Bing may finally have a chance.

Let’s say a news site makes enough from a page view that they can pay their employees. The more page views the employees’ content generates, the more money they make, and the more money the website makes.

Now what if that news site decided to take Microsoft up on its offer, and the employees’ stories disappeared from the Google?

The news site would take a short-term hit to their web site traffic, and they would lose money.

But Microsoft might use co-op advertising to try and bring this web site traffic back to the news site, running ads reading, say, “read so-and-so’s article, only through Bing,” maybe with that employee’s picture. Some of these ads would run on the news site, so in addition to the link payment there’s online ad revenue coming in to the publisher.

Now let’s assume that, instead of compensating the employees based on page views, the news site just paid them a straight salary, and divorced them from its business model. Now its search deal with Microsoft becomes none of the employees’ business, just as its relationships with the advertisers on their page are none of their business.

Maybe the employees will get a raise, but that decision won’t ride on their web site traffic but the news site’s view on the employees’ writing, on their editorial contribution, and on how they help make the site look good.

You start to see how this works. But it starts with Microsoft getting its investment back. Can it generate enough online ad revenue from general news searchers at Bing to make up for whatever it pays News Corp., ZDNet, or any other content provider?

And how might Google then respond? Will it add video ads to Google News, and share that revenue with the sites who link to it? Will we then have to use two news search engines in order to find out what’s going on in the world? Only time will tell.

Use Your Ad Dollars Wisely in a Growing Economy: Leveraging for Better Ads

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This time I will talk about negotiating in a buyer’s market and leveraging your business to get the most out of your New Jersey advertising dollars.

Since we are in a buyer’s market right now, your business is in a great position to add as much value as possible. For television advertising this can mean that your business is mentioned more in intros and outros to commercial breaks. For radio advertising, this means a higher frequency of mentioning your business’s name, or co-op advertising of a local event. For print advertising, this means bigger ads and more ad placement.

Finally, you should try to leverage any online marketing package that is presented to you in order to get as many leads as possible.

Next time, I will talk about establishing a reputation management campaign by being a contrarian.

What Do You Do and Where Do You Do It From? – Local Search Made Simple

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What and where? These are the two big questions that must be answered over and over again in local SEM.

Local searchers ask these questions implicitly and explicitly. In some cases, geo-terms are used and in other cases they aren’t. For example, search queries can be “SEM experts in NJ,” “SEO NJ” or simply “SEM experts” or “SEO.”

Search engines such as Google and Yahoo want to know the same things about your business that searchers want to know. Where is it and what products/services does it offer?

Are you answering these critical questions for your potential sales leads as well as the search engines?

Many times local businesses choose a website development firm based on the attractiveness of the websites they create without giving any thought to SEO. Even those website designers who know how to help with search rankings are rarely knowledgeable enough about the specifics of ranking for local search. As a result, the local business owner ends up with a beautiful website that never ranks for competitive keywords or attracts any new customers.

By following a few simple tips and tricks, you can prevent this from happening to your online marketing investment.

Your Home Page

You need to make it clear to people who land on your page what you do and where you do it. Simply because everyone in New Jersey knows where Broad Street is, it doesn’t mean that everyone who sees a Broad Street address on your website will know that you’re in New Jersey. The searcher may be entirely new to the area or just passing through, which may be the reason why someone may be searching for your business in the first place.

So, if you’re a New Jersey advertising firm, don’t expect people to look around to find that information on your site. Say it clearly near the top of the page and do it in text form, that way it is unmistakable to the search engines as well as to the searchers. Don’t assume anything! It’s important to make this information so clear that it can’t possibly be misunderstood.

Your Page Title

This is the most important ranking factor for SEM. And if that isn’t enough of a reason, then think about it from the human point of view.

Google displays the page title as the headline in the listing that appears for your pages in the SERPs. If someone is for searching for “search engine marketing new jersey” and the headline they see in the search results says “THE SEM experts in NJ,” it’ll grab their attention much better than a headline that says “Search Marketers”.

Google will also bold the words that were in a search query in the title when it appears on the page. So, for example, if a searcher in Central NJ asks for “co-op advertising” and your page title says “The Co-Op Advertising Professionals in Central NJ”, then your title will look like this to the searcher: “The Co-Op Advertising Professionals in Central NJ”.

Your Meta Tags

Along with your page title, these are also displayed in the SERPs. Meta tags are like the ad copy that entices people to click on your listings and go to your website.

Much like the page title, if your meta tags have the terms used in the search query then Google will bold these words on the SERPs. If the tags don’t contain the keyword phrase that was used in the query, then Google will pull a snippet off the page that contains that phrase.

It’s important to use your best keyword terms in your meta tags because, even though they may not help your pages to rank, they will likely encourage searchers to click through to your site.

In my next post, I will give more tips and tricks on how to clearly tell the search engines and the searchers where you are and what you do.